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Archive for the ‘Joining Forces for Women Veterans’ Category

BPW/NC Provides Grants to Women Veterans

Posted by YWM on July 17, 2014

NC grantsIn 2014 BPW/NC launched a grant program to provide funding to women veteran professionals or business owners in North Carolina to be used for training, startup capital or business related expenses. During BPW/NC’s recent convention, $500 grants were awarded to MSgt Barbara J. Bozeman, USAF (Ret.) and Tina Smith, USA (E-4 Specialist).

Ms. Bozeman joined the Air Force because she knew she wanted a career and ended up staying for over twenty years. The most important lesson she learned in the military was that regardless of the circumstances, she was never alone, and that she was responsible to and responsible for everyone with whom she served. This gave her both a great sense of freedom to grow as an individual and as a leader. She plans to use the Women Veteran Grant to create a more professional display for her photography business, Sights and Hounds Photography.

When Ms. Smith was in the 9th grade she knew she wanted to be a soldier and enrolled in the Junior Reserves Officer Training Corps program. She has gone on to obtain a Bachelors of Science Degree in Human Service and a Master’s of Science of in Organizational Management Leadership. Her career goal has always been to use her degrees to help others out. She plans to use the Women Veteran Grant to help boost her business, Germacide Cleaning Solutions.

 

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Posted in Joining Forces for Women Veterans, Small Business, Uncategorized, Women Veterans | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Veterans Charity Challenge

Posted by BPW Foundation Contributer on July 2, 2014

As you may have heard BPW Foundation is in the midst of the Veterans Charity Challenge, an online fundraising campaign through CrowdRise. The founders of Craigslist have pledged $20,000 to the top fundraising organization, $10,000 to second place and $5,000 to third.

The last four weeks of the Challenge has seen great success for us, but as we reach this final DAY, it is time to go into over-drive to reach our goal. Thanks to donors like you, we are almost there! We need your help to finish strong and raise an additional $2,000 by the end of the Challenge at 10am on July 3rd to win.

No amount is too small please visit www.crowdrise.com/jfmp and show your support for woman veterans, military spouses, caregivers of a wounded warrior and survivors of fallen service members.

Posted in Joining Forces for Women Veterans, Veterans | Leave a Comment »

Your Job Search is a Marathon, Not a Sprint

Posted by BPW Foundation Contributer on June 13, 2014

The first in the series The Strength of Your Service…and Beyond 

By Chris Rath

Before my first marathon, I could not fathom running 26.2 miles.  Training for a long distance takes preparation, commitment and tenacity.  Your job search requires the same philosophy.  Finding a new job does not typically happen overnight neither does running a marathon with no training.  Here are tips to running one of the biggest races of your life – finding a job to your second career.

  1. Set a goal.  Right, it’s to find a job.  But not so fast.  Is your goal to find a job or a career? Are you looking for something long term or short term? What is your target industry or company size? Just as in race training, I had to plan for my pace, water breaks, etc.  So, take time to make a plan to help you focus and measure your process so you can make adjustments and move forward.
  2. Rely on a support system. For me, having running buddies and my family’s support got me through the long haul.  The same can make a tremendous difference in your search.  Build upon your existing network and reconnect. If you do not have a mentor, consider someone who has recently separated find military-friendly organizations who offer mentoring through free career mentors and professional resources. Your support system will only continue to grow with people who want to help you.
  3. Practice.  Marathon training often includes a few shorter races to help you prepare for race day.  Preparation for your job search activities should also be done.  As many of you are aware, have a good elevator speech and prepare for common interview questions.  But, take it one step further and continue to evaluate and refine.  Use your support system to work out the bugs so you can feel more relaxed and competitive on interview day.
  4. Change it up.  Conditioning through a variety of exercises better prepared me.  Some days I ran intervals; other days I ran hills – all with the same goal of helping me finish the race successfully.  The same goes for your resume.  While many of you know that refining and tailoring your resume is a constant process, it does get time consuming.  But remember, the end goal is to get you through finish line…with a new job!
  5. Take it easy. Don’t give up.  Stay positive.

To learn more about job searching for your second career, look for more installments of our series, “The Strength of Your Service…and Beyond.”

christine RathChris Rath leads the Veteran Recruiting Program for Booz Allen Hamilton, a publicly traded strategy and technology consulting firm based in Mclean, VA.  The program is focused on employment opportunities for former military, transitioning military, military spouses, guard and reservists.  Candidates may connect with me, other Booz Allen employees/recruiters, and transitioning military colleagues through our Booz Allen Transitioning Military Recruiting LinkedIn Group at https://www.linkedin.com/groups?mostRecent=&gid=5144107&trk=my_groups-tile-flipgrp

Booz Allen is an Employer of Choice for former military personnel, who make up a third of our workforce. We’re committed to supporting veterans, Reservists, National Guardsmen and women, and other employees with military backgrounds through outreach, training programs, and our Armed Services Forum, which provides support, camaraderie, and resources for employees formerly or currently serving our nation.

Visit www.boozallen.com/careers/transitioningmilitary to find out more about these and other unparalleled opportunities for transitioning military personnel and veterans, and to learn about webinars and other upcoming events.

Joining Forces Mentoring Plus offers free unlimited personal career and employment coaching and professional guidance – including working women mentors – for women veterans, female military spouses, caregivers of wounded warriors and survivors of fallen soldiers.  Visit www.JoiningForcesMentoringPlus.org. Volunteer women employees from partners including Booz Allen Hamilton and others are waiting to share their expertise and experience with you!

Posted in Joining Forces, Joining Forces for Women Veterans, Military, Military Families, Veterans, Women Veterans | Leave a Comment »

Honoring Our Fallen Sisters This Memorial Day

Posted by Crystal Williams on May 22, 2014

Memorial Day is one of our nation’s most solemn and revered holidays— we extend our sincere gratitude to these servicemen and women in uniform who gave their lives so we might live in freedom. We honor their memory and pray for peace.

This is also a day when we would like to bring special attention to the sacrifice of our fallen sisters who have died during the war on terror. Since the war began there have been over 157 service women who have bravely perished in defense of our great country. A complete list of the fallen servicewomen can be found by visiting Women in Military Service in America (WIMSA) we invite you to take a moment and remember these women and consider making a donation to WIMSA Memorial to honor them.

We also encourage you to visit the Washington Post’s Faces of the Fallen. Faces of the Fallen provides information about each U.S. service member who died as a result of the War on Terror. Please take a moment to remember and honor these mothers, daughters, wives, sisters, and friends this Memorial Day.

 

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Pictures taken from Washingtonpost.com Faces of the Fallen

Research by Magda Jean-Louis, Greg Linch, Whitney Fetterhoff and Mary Hadar.

Application design and development by Sisi Wei, Jeremy Bowers and Wilson Andrews.

Posted in Joining Forces for Women Veterans, Military, Military Families, Veterans | Leave a Comment »

Looking back on my military career, I most regret…

Posted by BPW Foundation Contributer on May 20, 2014

By Kayla Williams

I wrote Love My Rifle More Than You: Young and Female in the US Army while still serving in the Army, right after getting home from Iraq; it hit shelves just months after I left active duty. Everything was fresh in my mind – but it was also raw and unprocessed. Rather than empathy and understanding, at that time I was still filled with a lot of anger and frustration. Overall, I do not regret the book – it very accurately captures who I was and how I felt in those moments. But that doesn’t mean I don’t have any regrets.

As a woman soldier on a deployment to Iraq, during major combat operations I didn’t think my gender mattered much. When we took small arms fire, no men flung themselves in front of me to save me – they just did their jobs. When I went on combat foot patrols with the infantry in Baghdad, the only thing the men in that unit cared about was that I spoke Arabic and they needed me to communicate with the local population. The only way my presence as a woman mattered was that it seemed to make the local people, especially the women, more comfortable and willing to approach us. During downtime with other units, there were a few sexualized jokes, but nothing that I found surprising or distressing after three years in the Army (and college before that – it did not come as any sort of shock to me that young men think and talk about sex quite a bit).

After major combat operations were over, however, things changed. I ended up at a remote combat outpost where I was the only woman around first seven or eight and then 20 or 30 men. We were about halfway through our deployment, so we’d gone for a long time with no break, but couldn’t yet see the light at the end of the tunnel. The sixth through eighth months were the worst, after that we could see a way out and things calmed down again. During that dark time, though, there was an overall breakdown in discipline. One guy refused to shave for a few weeks, a violation of Army regulations. Another cried and punched himself in the face all night one night. Within that larger context, I experienced a particularly egregious example of what I considered sexual harassment (although technically it meets the criteria for unwanted sexual contact or sexual assault): a fellow soldier pulled out his penis and tried to put my hand on it.

In the aftermath, I encountered responses from fellow soldiers that I should not “ruin his career” just because I “couldn’t take it.” Some asked, “What did you expect to happen when you joined a man’s Army?” This was not my chain of command, which I thought would have been receptive had I chosen to report the incident – it was the attitude I had encountered ever since joining the military from my male peers whenever discussing inappropriate sexual behavior by other male troops.

That bad act and the responses that followed dramatically altered my behavior and attitude. Prior to that incident, I thought I was “one of the guys.” For example, in periods of extreme boredom, they threw pebbles at each other’s groins; when they started throwing them at my breasts I felt accepted rather than harassed.

After the incident, I stopped joining in the jokes. I became colder, more aloof, and started insisting that I be treated with more professionalism and respect (it helped that I also got promoted soon after). I blamed myself for the incident, fearing I’d inadvertently given off signals that made him think his advances would be welcome.  I became convinced that in that particular setting – where we never got nights or weekends off to go home and relax with friends or loved ones, never got a break from the tension or each other – I couldn’t be myself. There was too much risk. I decided, that if I were friendly or outgoing, it could be misinterpreted as an invitation to more than just friendship.

Around this time, I also became much more judgmental of other women.

A man in my unit had a breakdown from the stress and had to be evacuated, and other men said, “Bob couldn’t take it.” A woman had to be flown to Germany to have a medical exam related to a change in her breast health, and men said, “This is why none of you belong here.” A man had to be medically evacuated after shooting himself in the leg in an accidental discharge, and the reaction was, “Jim is an idiot.” A woman got sent home after accidentally getting pregnant, and the response was, “This is why women don’t belong in combat.” In that setting, early in the war and serving with many men who had never served with military women before, I realized that I did not represent Kayla: I represented all women soldiers.

This responsibility weighed heavily on me. I developed a desire to be able to pass the male physical fitness test so men couldn’t claim I wasn’t strong enough to be there. I became focused on proving my worth and demonstrating that I was an asset to the mission, not merely for my own personal self respect but out of the desire to prove that women belonged in the combat zone, could accomplish the mission, deserved equal treatment and opportunities.

At the same time, when I met women who clearly had not internalized this desire, I began to resent and look down on them. I was angry that they made the rest of us look bad, upset that I had to pay a price when they had an ethical lapse, professional failure, or showed weakness. I felt no sense of “sisterhood” with the women I served with if they were not living up to the high standards I had begun to hold myself to, just irritation and disappointment.

Looking back on my military career, this is what I am most ashamed of. Despite enlisting a little later (I joined the Army at 22), for whatever reason I had not developed the emotional maturity or leadership skills to respond appropriately. I wish I could go back and tell my younger self to seize those opportunities as a way to help those women grow and mature professionally rather than just despising them.

Although that opportunity is lost, I am trying to do what I can to make up for it now. I take part in BPW’s Joining Forces Mentoring Plus and engage in informal peer mentoring. I am also openly and honestly admitting my past failings in speeches and writings, urging others to learn from my mistakes and do better than I did. While we must continue to address the structural inequalities and entrenched sexism that set the stage for some of the problems I encountered, it is also important that women work on how we respond to those circumstances, both individually and together.

About Kayla Williams

kaylaKayla Williams is a Truman National Security Project Fellow and the author of Love My Rifle More Than You: Young and Female in the US Army and the recently-released Plenty of Time When We Get Home: Love and Recovery in the Aftermath of War.

 

Posted in Joining Forces for Women Veterans, Military, Women Veterans | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »

Benefits of Mentoring for Women Veterans

Posted by YWM on May 7, 2014

Testimony of Dawn Smith, Joining Forces Mentoring Plus mentee, before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Small Business, May 7,2014.

Dawn SmithMr. Chair, Madam Ranking Member, and members of the Committee, thank you for the opportunity to be here today. My name is Dawn Smith. I am the Founder and CEO of Mystic Reme Teas in Greenville, South Carolina, and testifying today on behalf of Business and Professional Women’s Foundation.

As a woman veteran who recently started my own business, I hope my experiences can be helpful to the committee as you examine which government and nonprofit programs can best assist and meet the unique needs of women veterans as they transition back to civilian life.

I am very proud of my military service. I served in the Air Force for eight years and was deployed six times to Iraq, Afghanistan, Turkey and Germany. My expertise in the military was logistics, which means I was responsible for making sure that the movement of both troops and cargo got to the right place and were on time. In both Iraq and Afghanistan I was a Terminal Operations Manager responsible for processing and loading more than 7,000 passengers and directing the shipment of hundreds of thousands of tons of cargo. My work was consistently recognized for meeting excellent delivery and departure standards. I also earned my MBA while in the military.

Because of my advanced logistics experience and MBA, I really didn’t think I would have a problem finding a rewarding career when I left the service. But when I returned home to North Carolina to raise my children on my own, I was not even considered for management jobs; instead, I was offered positions like a warehouse worker, which I did not think utilized my skills, education and experience. For a couple of years I took various jobs that did not fit my background including working as a high school teacher and secretary since I needed to feed my children. These jobs offered neither the career I was seeking nor the salary commensurate with my experience.

BPW JFMPlogo.lowWhile working, I continued to look for a more rewarding and financially secure position. I returned to school to begin a master’s program in accounting. But looking for a job while managing the demands of work, school and motherhood, I became discouraged. I knew I needed help, so I turned to the internet to see what career resources might be available for a woman veteran. I was very fortunate to find Business and Professional Women’s Foundation, a non-profit organization that runs a free career mentoring program for women veterans, Joining Forces Mentoring Plus®. What attracted me to their program was that working women volunteers mentor women veterans (like me) to help us navigate a path to successful civilian careers, and even pursue entrepreneurial opportunities. Participants can access a free “high-tech/high-touch” internet community that includes experienced women mentors as coaches, navigators and supporters.

I immediately signed up and was assigned a wonderfully accomplished mentor, Sandy Smith. Sandy worked with me one-on-one and was persistent in offering advice and support on everything from interviewing skills to resume development. She pushed me, checking on how many resumes I sent out each day. She helped me create a new mindset that gave me the courage to apply for positions that previously I wouldn’t have thought possible. In 2012, I was hired as an auditor by the U.S. Defense Contract Audit Agency. I am happy to report that my salary at this job was twice what I had been making previously. After landing the job, Sandy, my mentor, did not leave me on my own but coached me on office etiquette and protocols necessary to successfully navigate the civilian sector workplace. All of Sandy’s mentoring and coaching paid off: I love my job and feel my career is now on very solid ground.

But even though I love my job, I have always dreamed of owning my own business. With Sandy’s encouragement and sustained mentoring last year, I started an online store that sells my own brand of tea. I am very excited that Mystic Reme Teas is currently in the final selection round to appear on Shark Tank. If I am chosen, I will be seeking funding to open my own tea bar.

I truly believe none of this would have happened without the personal mentoring and wide array of career resources offered by BPW Foundation. It was so successful for me because it was designed by and for women. Generic veteran-based employment and career development programs too often miss the unique elements and needs that matter most to women veterans. We need awareness and guidance about available support and employment resources, and programs that support and recognize the multiple roles impacting women veterans and their access to jobs.

I can attest to the fact that women leaving the service often face unique challenges including single motherhood or care giving for family members, including wounded warriors. Also women veterans often do not identify as veterans and don’t know they can access a wide array of benefits. We are frequently looked at differently from our fellow male veterans. Women who served in war zones are often not afforded the same level of prestige as their male counterparts.

Thanks to the generous support of BPW Foundation and its partners such as Alliant Credit Union Foundation, Booz Allen Hamilton, Cengage Learning, Citi, CVS Caremark, and others, there is no cost to participate in this mentoring program – it’s absolutely free for the women who participate.

Thank you for this opportunity to share my story and tell you about the resources that helped me begin my successful career and start my business. I hope that other women veterans will benefit from my experience and that the committee will support programs that are tailored for the challenges and needs that our women veterans face as they seek meaningful lives after our time in the military

Click here to read Dawn’s full testimony

Posted in Career Advancement, Joining Forces for Women Veterans, Small Business, Uncategorized, Women Veterans | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Honoring Military Nurse Marsha Four

Posted by Crystal Williams on May 6, 2014

Marsha Four: Bringing humanity to veteran transitions through mentoring

On National Nurse’s Day, BPW Foundation is proud to honor and recognize the nurses who give so much of themselves personally and professionally to care for all of us. Thank you! We are also pleased to recognize Marsha Four, BPW Foundation Women Joining Forces Advisory Council Member and current National Vice President of Vietnam Veterans of America , who has dedicated her life to this profession and to serving our country.

Marsha Four is a Vietnam in- country veteran who served on active duty with the Army Nurse Corps from 1967 to 1970.  READ MORE

Posted in Joining Forces, Joining Forces for Women Veterans, Military | Leave a Comment »

You Are Invited To Celebrate Women’s History — Make Women’s History Event Tuesday – March 18, 2014 at The United States Navy Memorial

Posted by Crystal Williams on February 26, 2014

Honorary Chair, First Lady Michelle Obama

In celebration of Women’s History Month 2014, we invite you to join Business and Professional Women’s (BPW) Foundation to honor the achievements, dedication to duty, and patriotism of women veterans, military/veteran spouses, female caregivers of wounded warriors, and women who have lost a loved one serving our nation.

We are pleased to recognize the vital contributions made by 

Joining Forces Mentoring Plus® Champions:

Angel Outreach Award: Courtney Banks Spaeth, 
Founder & CEO of NSAWW

Innovative Programming Award: Alliant Credit Union

Action with Compassion Award: Booz Allen Hamilton

 Grassroots Award: BPW North Carolina

Career Development Panel, Tools & Resources for the Civilian Workplace

Learn about tools and resources valuable in identifying a career path and pursuing the route to success in the civilian workplace

Career Development Panel, Social Media Strategies for Career Success
Find out how to use social media to support you as you explore industries and opportunities, create your online brand, and cultivate networks

Cocktail & Networking/Awards Reception

women

Date:
Tuesday – March 18, 2014
Time:
Career Development Panels: 4-6 pm
Cocktails, Networking Reception & Awards Presentation: 6-8pm
Location:
The United States Navy Memorial
701 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, DC 20004
Register: Register before March 13th (Space is limited)
Join as an Event Sponsor! Please contact Mary Ann Sack
masack@bpwfoundation.org
 
 
Moderated by Erika Gonzalez,
NBC4 News Anchor
 
Guest parking available at reduced $8 rate at PMI Parking (D Street NW, between 8th and 9th Streets; Entrance next to the Caucus Room Restaurant). Please bring your ticket to the event for validation.
 EVENT-SPONSOR_STARSMARCH5

Posted in BPW, Joining Forces, Joining Forces for Women Veterans, Media, Mentoring, Mentoring Advisory Council, Military, Military Families | Leave a Comment »

Engaging More Than One Million Girls and Young Women in STEM Education and Careers

Posted by YWM on January 23, 2014

BPWFoundationlogocolorBusiness and Professional Women’s (BPW) Foundation is partnering with the “Million Women Mentors” (MWM) initiative.  Launched in January during National Mentoring Month, the initiative will support the engagement of one million science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) mentors – male and female – to increase the interest and confidence of girls and young women to pursue and succeed in STEM degrees and careers.

Supporting women in non-traditional fields has long been part of BPW Foundation’s mission. Since 1969, BPW’s career advancement scholarships have provided financial assistance to financially disadvantaged women 25 years of age or older seeking to further their education, advance their careers or re-enter the workforce. BPW Foundation solicits prospective scholarship candidates from its state and local Legacy members.  Most of last year’s scholarship recipients are pursing degrees in STEM or related fields.

BPW Foundation’s goal is to share information about Million Women Mentors among its legacy chapters across the country, to engage STEM mentors and to encourage young girls and women interested in STEM fields to pursue their goals with the help of a mentor.  One aspect of BPW Foundation’s commitment to mentoring young women is the BPW Young Careerist program conducted by BPW local and state organizations which recognizes and assists young women as they start their careers.  In addition, BPW members provide career enhancement tools to women of all ages through locally conducted Individual Development programs.  joining this initiative is a natural fit with our ongoing work.

“With our legacy of ‘working women helping women work®’ BPW Foundation is proud to partner with Million Women Mentors to support women across their STEM career spectrum, from young careerists to mid and upper-level professionals, to those transitioning out of the military,” said BPW Foundation CEO Deborah Frett.

BPW Foundation also seeks to leverage this partnership to promote access to STEM career opportunities among women veterans, military spouses and women who have lost a loved one serving in the Armed Forces. “Many women veterans leave the militarywith a wealth of technical training and experience, but they don’t know how to translate those skills into meaningful careers,” said Leslie Wilkins , member of the BPW Foundation Board of Trustees and Founder and Director, MEDB’s Women in Technology Project.  “Having access to STEM professionals through Million Women Mentors will help these skilled women, who unselfishly served our country, leverage their skills and tap into careers in STEM. Million Women Mentor’s work can also support the talented pool of unemployed and underemployed military spouses and surviving family members and bridge the gap (often due to multiple moves or the loss of a loved one) to a successful career in STEM.”

In the past 10 years, growth in STEM jobs has been three times greater than that of non-STEM jobs. Today 80% of the fastest growing occupations in the United States depend on mastery of mathematics and knowledge and skills in hard sciences. While women comprise 48% of the U.S. workforce, just 24% are in STEM fields, a statistic that has held constant for nearly the last decade. While 75% of all college students are women and students of color, they represent only 45% of STEM degrees earned each year. Too many of these young women begin in STEM but leave those degree paths despite their good academic standing, often citing uncomfortable classroom experiences and disconcerting climate. Even when women earn a STEM degree, they are less likely than their male counterparts to work in a STEM field even though STEM jobs pay more and have a lower wage gap: 92 cents on a dollar versus 75 cents in other fields.

“Clearly the need for women in STEM is there,” said Frett.  “By tapping into current pools of talent among our women veteran and military spouse community, and contributing to tomorrow’s STEM professionals among our young careerists, BPW Foundation continues its vision to partner to create successful workplaces for women, their families and employers.”

Posted in girls, Joining Forces for Women Veterans, Mentoring, STEM, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

CAREER MENTORING FOR WOMEN COPING WITH THE DEATH OF A SERVICE MEMBER

Posted by YWM on January 16, 2014

Surviving spouses, sisters, mothers and other women grieving a loss can get career mentoring

BPW mentoring logo.cThe Business and Professional Women’s (BPW) Foundation and the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) are partnering to provide career mentoring and resources to military widows, surviving sisters, surviving mothers and other women who have lost a loved one serving in the Armed Forces.

Through BPW Foundation’s Joining Forces Mentoring Plus program , (JFMP) surviving spouses and other female family members will have access to its no-cost national mentoring program. The program uses both one-on-one contact and a sophisticated online platform of resources for this deserving cohort of women. Mentorships and resources extend beyond job attainment to support job retention and career advancement.

“Since January is National Mentoring Month we couldn’t be more excited to announce our partnership with TAPS to support military spouses, daughters, mothers, sisters and fiancées, who have tragically lost a loved one who served our country,” said BPW Foundation CEO Deborah Frett.

“In addition to their grief, these women now face the difficult challenge of rebuilding their lives.  Having the option of a meaningful, sustainable career is often key to this effort.”  Joining Forces Mentoring Plus provides access to free mentoring provided by volunteer working women, Subject Matter Experts for special needs, and a vast number of state-of-the-art career resources through our internet platform.

“And our unique benefit of Working Women Helping Women Work® provides these female military spouses/family members with a truly understanding helping hand,” Frett added. The program offers tailored mentoring to assist career development.

“We are so grateful to the Business and Professional Women’s Foundation for offering the Joining Forces Mentoring Plus program for free to women grieving the death of a loved one who served in the Armed Forces,” said Bonnie Carroll, military widow and TAPS founder.

Carroll said that career mentoring is often very helpful for women grieving the loss of a loved one who served in the Armed Forces. “Families of our fallen troops often change career courses completely following the death of their loved one. They have to build a new life after the deaths of their loved ones and many have to find a new direction in life. Having such a caring and supportive mentoring program available will be an invaluable resource for the families left behind by our fallen troops.”

If you are a surviving spouse, mother, daughter, sister, or other who has lost a loved one serving in our Armed Forces, you can get involved by visiting www.JoiningForcesMentoringPlus.org or contacting Helpdesk@bpwfoundation.org.

Posted in Career Advancement, Joining Forces for Women Veterans, Mentoring, Military Families, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »